The Effect of Leadership and Gender Roles on Alcohol Use in the Greek Community

Amelia Kinsella

Abstract


On college campuses, there is a relationship between membership in the Greek community and alcohol use (Larimer, 1992; Larimer et al. 2000; Capone et al., 2007). For example, Greek students engage in more drinking behaviors in terms of quantity as well as frequency, and also experience more negative consequences as a result of alcohol use (Cashin et al., 1998; Capone, et al., 2007). Additionally, there is a relationship between gender, gender identity, gender roles and alcohol use. Moreover, there are gender differences regarding alcohol use. On average, men drink more in terms of quantity and frequency (Lemle & Mishkind, 1989). Individuals who exhibit more masculine traits engage in more alcohol use and experience more negative consequences as a result of alcohol use (McCreary et al., 1999; Huselid & Cooper, 1992). Furthermore, individuals who exhibit more feminine traits are less likely to engage in alcohol use (Chomak & Collins, 1987; Celentano & McQueen, 1984; Zucker et al., 1981). More recently, researchers have studied different aspects of gender identity to determine different relationships between gender identity and alcohol use. For example, masculine roles are more predictive of alcohol use in men, whereas drinking cognitions are more predictive of alcohol use in women (Ricciardelli et al., 2001). The purpose of this study is to examine leadership and gender roles in the Greek system with respect to their effects on alcohol use. Data will be collected through an online survey distributed to undergraduate students at a mid-sized, Midwestern university. Results will be analyzed and implications will be discussed.


Keywords


Perceived Social Norms; Gender Identity; Greek Community

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